The 7 1/2 Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle

The Book Pick for August was brought to Dine & Opine by member Hetal.

Book Synopsis:

The Rules of Blackheath
Evelyn Hardcastle will be murdered at 11:00 p.m. 
There are eight days, and eight witnesses for you to inhabit. 
We will only let you escape once you tell us the name of the killer. 
Understood? Then let’s begin…

***
Evelyn Hardcastle will die. Every day until Aiden Bishop can identify her killer and break the cycle. But every time the day begins again, Aiden wakes up in the body of a different guest. And some of his hosts are more helpful than others.

For fans of Claire North and Kate Atkinson, The 7½ Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle is a breathlessly addictive novel that follows one man’s race against time to find a killer― but an astonishing time-turning twist means that nothing and no one are quite what they seem.

Book Discussion:

This time around a fellow Dine & Opine lady decided to write up a quick summary of our evening. I will first share what Suhanti wrote and then will dive into the conversation that took place during the discussion. Setting up the background- We met at the Manchester which has a speakeasy… complete with a hidden door and a needed password. Very Mysterious and in line with the “Mystery” portion of the book.

From Suhanti “

All of us met in the parking lot and went in together.  Karie was the only one who remembered the password  for us to enter the speakeasy.  What looked like a wall had the hidden door which led to an unlit flight of steps down to the speakeasy area.  Most of us were clutching the bannister while cautiously making our way down which brought us to a poorly lit area with couches and stools.  The alternative was to sit in a row on high chairs around the bar. Despite the unconventional seating situation, the cocktails and appetizers, of which we made a meal of, were a big hit.  From the traditional spinach and artichoke dip with fried pita bread to shrimp tempura on a bed of hummus, roasted Brussels sprouts, fried pickles and lobster Mac and cheese it was all gone.  A good thing the server clarified if we wanted 5 orders of shrimp tempura.  Not sure where he heard 5 orders.  The deviled eggs which were ordered never made it to the table nor did the chocolate torte dome. Ambience was good till a bus load of people landed there and the bad service deteriorated to nonexistent.  Had to literally stand over the computer to get our bills printed.  We had to stop to take pictures by the wall with the invisible door on our way out.  As we had not indulged our sweet tooth, we decided to go to Amelie’s French bakery in NODA.  After gathering all our desserts we ended up in a table we had to share with a couple.  They managed to continue on without being spooked by us.  The desserts were chocolate petit gateau, creme brûlée, salted caramel brownie, salted caramels brownie cake, mini pecan and berry tarts.  Shoba ordered “xxxx” coffee (name slips me) which to all our outrage was in a paper cup the size of a shot glass.  It also tasted burnt.  
Now coming to the book, it received a thumbs up from those who read the book, and discussion was lively that it intrigued Anishaa enough that she said that she will read the book.  Karie took notes which she will share with us.  Book picks were handed out and the winner was “the Alice network.  It was a tie between that and “the girl who escaped ISIS”.  I am beginning to nod off.  So hitting the “send”.

Discussion:

The Glove- A turning point for many as to when they were finally “into” the book. It was discussed that the note was a turning point to when the story captivated many of us.. however the overall use of that captivation fell short as there was really no mention afterwards.

It was a stupid book. I couldn’t put it down.

The concept is good.

all thumbs up with not person going to finish and a guest said she was intrigued to read the book.

The House of Broken Angels

The House of Broken Angels

Synopsis:

The House of Broken Angels is a sprawling and epic family saga helmed by patriarch Big Angel. The novel gathers together the entire De La Cruz clan, as they meet for the final birthday party Big Angel is throwing for himself, at home in San Diego, as he nears the end of his struggle with cancer and reflects on his long and full life.

But when Big Angel’s mother, Mama America, approaching one hundred, dies herself as the party nears, he must plan her funeral as well. There will be two family affairs in one weekend: a farewell double-header. Among the attendants is his half-brother and namesake, Little Angel, who comes face to face with the siblings with whom he shared a father but not, as the weekend proceeds to remind him, a life. 

This story of the De La Cruzes is the story of what it means to be a Mexican in America, to have lived two lives across one border. It is a tale of the ravaging power of death to shore up the bits of life you have forgotten, whether by choice or not. Above all, this finely wrought portrait of a deeply complex family and the America they have come to call home is Urrea at his purest and best. Teeming with brilliance and humor, authentic at every turn, The House of Broken Angels cements his reputation as a storyteller of the first rank.

Book Club Discussion:

And so we (Dine & Opine) met. We were going to meet at a new taco place- however after waiting for over 45 minutes for our table (was suppose to be 15) we left and ate at Tavern on the Tracks. Being the only member to finish this book (even though we had an extra week to finish); others were in various sections of the book; I say that this book was… not worth the read. The many characters were so numerous and many not even necessary. It was almost like the author tried too hard. Here is the advice:

Read the First Chapter. Read the Last Chapter…. boom. That will sum up the story.

Needless to say this book received a:

The House of Broken Angels Received a Thumbs Down

Next book was brought to us by Hetal: The 7 1/2 Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle by Stuart Turton. Better start reading!

The Passenger

The Passenger

The Passenger: By Lisa Lutz

Picked by Dine & Opine Susan

Synopsis:

In case you were wondering, I didn’t do it. I didn’t have anything to do with Frank’s death. I don’t have an alibi, so you’ll have to take my word for it…

Forty-eight hours after leaving her husband’s body at the base of the stairs, Tanya Dubois cashes in her credit cards, dyes her hair brown, demands a new name from a shadowy voice over the phone, and flees town. It’s not the first time.

She meets Blue, a female bartender who recognizes the hunted look in a fugitive’s eyes and offers her a place to stay. With dwindling choices, Tanya-now-Amelia accepts. An uneasy―and dangerous―alliance is born.

It’s almost impossible to live off the grid today, but Amelia-now-Debra and Blue have the courage, the ingenuity, and the desperation, to try. Hopscotching from city to city, Debra especially is chased by a very dark secret…can she outrun her past?

Book Discussion:

Dine & Opine met at Lucky Lou’s Tavern… we try to match something in the book to where we eat. In this case it was a dive bar. We sat down, ordered drinks and after a brief catch-up between everyone in attendance, we began to discuss the book.

I can tell you that we went through many of the questions found on LitLovers. The questions were fairly easy to answer and there was a bit of discussion. However nothing really to write home about. We all thought the book was an easy read and was a good “vacation” read. We did not think that it was a book that “wowed” us. The story was good, characters were mostly developed. That brings up one thing that the group did agree on… Dominic. His character seemed to be one that was left undeveloped. We wished that there would have been a bit more information on him. For his character to respond to Nora that way (Finding her interesting enough, etc) there has to be a back story on his character.

Overall we decided that this book receives a Sideways Thumb. It isn’t a book that we would recommend when asked for a good book you recently read; but it is a book that would be recommended to someone who enjoys an easy read, slight thriller book.

Next Month’s Book: The House of Broken Angels By Luis Alberto Urrea

Book was picked by Jennifer

The Kissing Quotient


The Kissing Quotient By Helen Hoang

Synopsis:

Stella Lane thinks math is the only thing that unites the universe. She comes up with algorithms to predict customer purchases—a job that has given her more money than she knows what to do with, and way less experience in the dating department than the average thirty-year-old.

It doesn’t help that Stella has Asperger’s and French kissing reminds her of a shark getting its teeth cleaned by pilot fish. Her conclusion: she needs lots of practice—with a professional. Which is why she hires escort Michael Phan. The Vietnamese and Swedish stunner can’t afford to turn down Stella’s offer, and agrees to help her check off all the boxes on her lesson plan—from foreplay to more-than-missionary position…

Before long, Stella not only learns to appreciate his kisses, but crave all of the other things he’s making her feel. Their no-nonsense partnership starts making a strange kind of sense. And the pattern that emerges will convince Stella that love is the best kind of logic…

Book Discussion:

The Ladies of Dine & Opine met this month to discuss TKQ. We met on a lovely Tuesday evening at CO. If you remember how we choose our books and where we eat… you know that we try to match something between the book and the restaurant. If you have forgotten, or are new to this site, check out the FAQ’s of Dine & Opine. This was Amy’s Book pick- so she chose to eat at CO, inspired by the heritage of Stella’s hunk male escort. Quick restaurant write-up. And even though she was in Italy and unable to attend- she was thought of during the meeting) A few “Things to know” 1- they do not take reservations. Which was fine. A few of us ladies seem to always be early. This is a great moment to put your name in and grab a drink at the bar. 2- The food is good. I, Karie, heard no complaints regarding the food. 3- It was a bit noisy (We were surprised for a Tuesday- however A) we don’t mind as we can be loud and B) it didn’t last long, 4- The appetizers are a decent size. Not too big, enough for 5 people to have a bite and sometimes 1 person to get 2. Perfect so you don’t over eat.

OK- Now time for the book. If you have read the book- we used the questions at the back of the book. The discussion began with the conversation regarding whether or not we knew of any Highly -Functioning Autistic adults and if Stella met what we would have imagined a HFAA would react/act. Many of us (I do believe none of us) have knowingly known a HFAA. So that part of the question was hard to answer. I was able to share that personally, I have experience with autism in younger family members and a teen (Who now is an adult). I have been able to see the difference that arises out of those that have/are understood and have a self awareness earlier on than those that receive counseling later in life. In my experience those that (not only themselves, also the family) recognized Autism and worked with it are much more self aware and are able to adjust/take in daily environments.

The conversation then moved onto Stella’s reaction to an intern asking out her co-worker Philip. The overall consensus was that Stella, being brought up by her parents who (Appeared in the book) to be old school. Stella’s response was appropriate. It seems, through clues in the book, that her mother was about being proper, in a 1950’s sort of way… not the 70’s free love way. We discussed whether that might have been a point where Stella saw a social norm (What is acceptable now) and how that helped her realize that she can take charge of that area of her life.

Before diving into the SEX. Let’s discuss Micheal. The idea of his profession came into question and BOY did that start a discussion. Pretty Woman (Yes the movie) was brought to the table as an example. A discussion on Escorts VS Prostitutes was promptly visited. With a divided table we argued the pros and cons of each. One outcome, which I am sure will begin a conversation, was that Men make better clients than women. This being that tendency of women getting attached. I know, I know. It sounds so sexist, so juvenile, so…. so…. yeah… history shows that women have a harder time to separate sex and emotions. Well First off- that just sucks. We all can agree that we love a good romp in the hay. Statistically speaking, many can’t leave the hay and until those statistics change (Which they are slowly).. we are left with that.

The next Michael question was “Throughout the book, Michael worries he’s inherited his father’s “badness,” that it was passed down in his blood. Do you think this is illogical? Are you able to empathize with him? If so, how? ” Well this is was a no-brainer for this group. It is a Nature vs Nurture discussion. Almost. A twist was proposed. When you grow up with a certain behavior around you, even if you are not even in line with that behavior. It does cause a pause. A moment where one is, every once in a while, looking over one’s shoulder. Wondering if they are in the clear or if it is just part of who we are… what we are made of… who we will eventually end up being. Whether it is correct or not… it lies on your mind like a paper weight.

The SEX.. The question asked was “Does it surprise you to see an autistic person exploring a sexual relationship? If so, why?” A few said yes. I said not really. Knowing that Stella was wanting to make her mom happy and she did want to get married, she wanted to, what she thought, was “get better” at sex. She understood that sex is part of a loving relationship and quite frankly needed for reproduction. I think she wanted to learn how to be comfortable with sex. In reality, she learned that sex just isn’t physical, there is a connection that is needed. That no matter how many check lists she made and completed; without that connection and understanding, she would never think that she was “Good” at sex.

Speaking of SEX… We, I do believe unanimously, decided that we would want a Michael over a Christian Grey anytime. That brought up a conversation of a “battle of the books” sort; 50 Shades of Grey vs The Kiss Quotient. I will say that we all agreed that the sex scenes of The Kiss Quotient were better written and, well I will just say it, definitely left the reader wanting more, than 50 shades of grey. The scenes in 50SoG felt repetitive and old after awhile.

Voting: And so it was time to vote. The Kiss Quotient received a:

Side Thumb

The main reason was that even though most enjoyed the book and it was a very easy read… It might not be a book that will get rereads. It is a book that we might pass along (To those 50 shades of grey fans) however it is not one that we believe would come up in conversation.

Next Book: The next book is from a list brought by Susan. The Passenger by Lisa Lutz. Pick up your copy, start reading and check back for the next blog soon!

Where the Crawdads Sing

March 2019 Book:

Where the Crawdads Sing.                                                  Book Pick: Sondra

Book Synopsis:

For years, rumors of the “Marsh Girl” have haunted Barkley Cove, a quiet town on the North Carolina coast. So in late 1969, when handsome Chase Andrews is found dead, the locals immediately suspect Kya Clark, the so-called Marsh Girl. But Kya is not what they say. Sensitive and intelligent, she has survived for years alone in the marsh that she calls home, finding friends in the gulls and lessons in the sand. Then the time comes when she yearns to be touched and loved. When two young men from town become intrigued by her wild beauty, Kya opens herself to a new life–until the unthinkable happens.

Perfect for fans of Barbara Kingsolver and Karen Russell, Where the Crawdads Sing is at once an exquisite ode to the natural world, a heartbreaking coming-of-age story, and a surprising tale of possible murder. Owens reminds us that we are forever shaped by the children we once were, and that we are all subject to the beautiful and violent secrets that nature keeps.

Book Discussion:

The Dine and Opine ladies met at Krazy Fish. Apparently the meeting took place on Whiskey Night so the notes are a bit fuzzy. I, myself, was not in attendance so I will add my personal thoughts at the bottom of this post. Deciphering the notes shared here are some topics that where discussed:

Setting- Taking place in the Marsh of NC, how did that shape the novel? The descriptiveness of the marsh- was it helpful to those readers whom have never visited a marsh? If the area was not so remote- would she have been able to get away with her actions, and just living the way she did?

Education- The topic of how mean people where to her when she went to school. Do you think people should have been more understanding? Do you agree with her for not returning to school?

Demographics- The hierarchy that took place in the book. Where did she fall in the line? Why was she treated differently by different groups?

Time- Could you place a timeline on the book? When was this happening?

Friendships- Jumping and Mable are friendly and drawn to help her… why? Once thought was that they were all seen as outsiders.

Why did her mom leave?

How is Womanhood revealed throughout the novel?

Is Tate a good partner?

The book received a Thumbs Up all around! So Welcome to the Best Of list!!

Karie’s Thoughts:

Two words: UGLY CRY. I began reading this book and I was intrigued. I don’t think you need to have grown up in the Marsh to be able to connect with Kya. In society, as a whole, no matter where you are- there are hierarchies and I bet that even you have felt like an outsider. Reading about the struggle the siblings went through prior to escaping is not only heart-wrenching but fuses your own experiences with leaving a bad situation (Whatever that might have been) with Kya.

Reading the struggles Kya deals with regarding school, acceptance, loneliness and basic survival made me admire her strength and her stubbornness. When she choose to let people in, it was as if there was an innocence that captivated those around her. Almost a pureness. She was who she is. I think it must be refreshing to meet someone who is upfront and isn’t looking to “gain” anything. Just to be.

As I mentioned early… I started this post with 2 words, UGLY CRY. I haven’t ugly cried to a book in a long while. Oh- I have gotten misty eyed or cried a few gentle tears…. This book… I bawled. Like If I would have had on make-up- my face would have been washed away. I was reading this book while on Spring break with the family. One night everyone was going to bed. I wanted to read so I curled up in a chair with the reading lamp on and a glass of wine. I thought I would read perhaps just a chapter or two. Well, two chapters later I am crying (Trying not to wake anyone) and I poured myself another glass of wine. That night I finished the book (I was only about 1/4 to 1/3 into the book when I originally sat down). I finished. Sat the book down. Poured another glass of wine and went and sat on the balcony watching the waves (We were in Ft. Lauderdale) to just decompress afterwards.

I agree with the Thumbs up. This book is a wonderful read and I can’t wait to discuss it with others who have read this book. Did you read the book? Did you like it? Love it? Hate it? Let us know!

Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine

February  2019 Book Pick

Eleanor Elephant is Completely Fine: A Novel

by Gail Honeyman

Synopsis:

No one’s ever told Eleanor that life should be better than fine.

Meet Eleanor Oliphant: She struggles with appropriate social skills and tends to say exactly what she’s thinking. Nothing is missing in her carefully timetabled life of avoiding social interactions, where weekends are punctuated by frozen pizza, vodka, and phone chats with Mummy.

But everything changes when Eleanor meets Raymond, the bumbling and deeply unhygienic IT guy from her office. When she and Raymond together save Sammy, an elderly gentleman who has fallen on the sidewalk, the three become the kinds of friends who rescue one another from the lives of isolation they have each been living. And it is Raymond’s big heart that will ultimately help Eleanor find the way to repair her own profoundly damaged one.

Soon to be a major motion picture produced by Reese Witherspoon, Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine is the smart, warm, and uplifting story of an out-of-the-ordinary heroine whose deadpan weirdness and unconscious wit make for an irresistible journey as she realizes. . .

The only way to survive is to open your heart.

 

Book Discussion:

Check back for Update!

 

My (Karie’s) Thoughts on Eleanor Oliphant is completely fine:

Where to start? There are so many points that should be covered in the discussion of this book. So let’s start with Eleanor. Well, I actually think almost every question that could be discussed probably includes Eleanor in some way. Let me just start from the beginning.

My first initial thought of Eleanor, honestly, was that she might have been on the spectrum for Autism. Having a nephew on the spectrum, I recognized a few similar traits. However, I believe I was wrong. The reason being that at the end of the book and learning everything about Eleanor- being socially non-immediately conforming is not a reason to believe that someone is on the spectrum. I actually was feeling quite mad at myself. See, for those that do not know me, I have a tendency to be a very up front, non-sugar coating, truth bomb type of person. I have always figured that if someone asks my opinion then I will give it. None of that “I love you but” bullcrap. COME ON…. the BUT cancels out the I love you part. Before I go off on some other thought tread lets continue, Just because Eleanor is up front with formalities and within the way she shares information shouldn’t have placed a label on her. I actually really love that about her character. Her straight forwardness, her attention to details and her bewilderment at the details that some choose to focus.

That brings me to my next point. The co-workers. I find it amusing that the co-workers (Raymond excluded) pretty much ignore and mock her…. until she starts adhering to the “Social Norms” i.e. wearing makeup, having newer/nicer clothes, hair done…. all the stereotypical woman magazine “Make Him Notice You” crap. I get it; I really do. We, as women, want to feel pretty. We fall into those traps. And what baffles me; is even though we will bitch and complain about it all, when someone doesn’t follow those “Rules” or “Social Norms” then some women will treat that person differently. Why? In today’s society it still baffles me that people, who aren’t the “Social norm”, must adjust their behavior to be liked or to make those around them comfortable. And this is only a 1 way road. Me, being me, I have never had someone change their conversation from some gossip to world news to make me feel included. I have been told to “be softer” or to “Say it nicer”. So why is it that it is expected for some to curve their personality and not others? If one is willing to bend- then others should as well.

On the flip side of this conversation- Because Eleanor decided to under go changes (Although it was for the “Project” i.e. a man) I wonder if she was ready for a change. After everything that happened to her and how long she has been harboring the details- I wonder if a part of her just wanted to rip out of her current shell and put on a new one- like a growing crab running out of space and finally reaches a point where it needs a new, bigger and brighter shell. I wonder if that is where the sudden onset of needing to change, to “fit the life style of what the musician would expect”, comes from. I think she might have needed a reason, to justify growing from the person who she was to who she wants to be.

Next discussion point: Mummy. This will be my last discussion point for a while. I am still making notes on a couple of things and actually I am excited for the Dine & Opine Discussion on this book. Many people are lucky enough to not have experienced anything traumatic. Unfortunately, there are those that have. How one deals with the events is different for each person. How I dealt worked for me… might not work for someone else. However, I think that a person, who has lived through something horrible, can understand why someone else might be dealing with their event in a certain way. Which is why I can kind of understand Eleanor and Mummy. Here are my thoughts:

Eleanor feels like she failed. No. Not just feel, in her eyes she did fail. She tried hard to be the perfect daughter, to make her mummy proud. Because I think she felt that if she could just make her mummy proud then all would be better. Mummy would be happy. When the fire happened and she learns that mummy set the fire on purpose- I think it broke her. Here she was trying, trying so hard to make everything right, trying to make her mummy happy and her mummy killed her sister and Eleanor was suppose to die- but survived. The guilt of not being able to save her sister, to live up to the crazy standards of mummy- standards that would never have been met, she blames herself. With the blame she keeps mummy in her head because she is scared to move forward. I think she was afraid to move on until the “Project”. I think her “project” was a way of breaking free and stepping out of her mummy’s shadow.

 

 

America is not the Heart

Synopsis:

How many lives fit in a lifetime?

When Hero De Vera arrives in America–haunted by the political upheaval in the Philippines and disowned by her parents–she’s already on her third. Her uncle gives her a fresh start in the Bay Area, and he doesn’t ask about her past. His younger wife knows enough about the might and secrecy of the De Vera family to keep her head down. But their daughter–the first American-born daughter in the family–can’t resist asking Hero about her damaged hands.

An increasingly relevant story told with startling lucidity, humor, and an uncanny ear for the intimacies and shorthand of family ritual, America Is Not the Heart is a sprawling, soulful debut about three generations of women in one family struggling to balance the promise of the American dream and the unshakeable grip of history. With exuberance, grit, and sly tenderness, here is a family saga; an origin story; a romance; a narrative of two nations and the people who leave one home to grasp at another.

 

Discussion:

Dine & Opine is starting the 2019 reading year off with a bang. We hope that you can join us in the reading of Elaine Castillo’s America is Not The Heart. Check back for the recap on the discussion.

The Glass Palace Book Discussion

 

Book: The Glass Palace by Amitav Ghosh

Month: December 2018

Restaurant: Inchin’s Bamboo Garden

Book Synopsis:

“Set in Burma during the British invasion of 1885, this masterly novel by Amitav Ghosh tells the story of Rajkumar, a poor boy lifted on the tides of political and social chaos, who goes on to create an empire in the Burmese teak forest. When soldiers force the royal family out of the Glass Palace and into exile, Rajkumar befriends Dolly, a young woman in the court of the Burmese Queen, whose love will shape his life. He cannot forget her, and years later, as a rich man, he goes in search of her. The struggles that have made Burma, India, and Malaya the places they are today are illuminated in this wonderful novel by the writer Chitra Divakaruni calls “a master storyteller.””

Book Discussion:

Well, what to say? First let’s start with my initial thoughts and that begins with a few fun facts:

  1. I restarted this book 3 times…. that’s right… THREE times. I would start the book, then put it down. When I picked the book up to continue; I had to restart because I was a bit confused on where I was in the story.
  2. I still haven’t finish the book.

Now for my thoughts. I am not far into the book, (I seriously just reached into my purse and pulled the damn thing out) I am on page 95; 95 out of 470. Ugh. The story feels disjointed. I can’t place my finger on the exact cause of this feeling. After discussing the book last night (We met on Tuesday instead of Thursday due to scheduling conflicts), I think I figured out at least one reason. This book is classified as Historical Fiction, which is a genre I LOVE, however the book does fall on the more historical side of the genre. Which isn’t a problem. The problem, for me, is not understanding why the author choose some topics to go into GREAT detail about and not others, often time just dropping a topic. The greatest example is his long, detailed description regarding Anthrax and the elephants. If you want to lose your appetite then read pages 79-82. Why so much detail was given on the pustules on the rear of an elephant that grow to the size of a pineapple and then begin to leak a whitish ooze, which in turn, then become Rivulets of blood-streaked puss and not on more details regarding the oo-si in the story or even more history, is beyond me.

The Group Discussion.

Here are the details around Dine & Opine’s meeting.

  • We officially have a new rule (now we really don’t – but kind of do- have rules so we like to poke fun at ourselves) Rule 500 sub paragraph a under book discussions: Discussion questions must be under 3 sentences long. A half page question will, from this point forward, be skipped. (After food and wine; our attention spans are not that long)
  • This book was not a hard read. However, if you choose to read this story- please note that the characters are not developed enough.
  • Again- this book falls heavily on the Historical part of the Historical Fiction genre.
  • This story is for those who want to know history that learn better through Visual Literature.

 

As always we concluded our meeting with Book Picks! This month it was Jennifer’s turn to bring the picks. The picks were as follows:

  • Insurrecto
  • America is not the Heart
  • In the Country: Stories

The winner (most votes) is America is not the Heart. We hope you read along!

Venetia Book Discussion

Book: Venetia by Georgette Heyer

Month: November 2018

Restaurant: Carpe Diem

Book Synopsis:

“Beautiful, capable, and intendent minded, Venetia Lanyon‘s life on her family’s estate in the country side is somewhat restricted.  But her neighbor, the infamous Lord Dameral, a charming rake shunned by polite society is about to shake things up.

Lord Damerel has built his life on his dangerous reputation, and when he meets Venetia, he has nothing to offer and everything to regret. Though his scandalous past and deepest secrets give Venetia reason to mistrust him, a rogue always gets what he wants.

As Venetia’s well-meaning family steps in to protect her from potential ruin, Venetia must find the wherewithal to take charge of her own destiny, or lose her chance at happiness.”

Discussion:

I cannot tell a lie. I love Period pieces. I just do. I find it absolutely fascinating to read a book taking place during a different time, and losing myself in the ways of that period. Now, with that being said.. I enjoyed this book- however apparently I didn’t read the whole book. Back story:

I ordered the book from amazon (the local store didn’t have it and it would have taken weeks to get the book in). The book was suppose to be delivered within 7 days. THAT DID NOT HAPPEN. As the days went by, it became apparent that the book would not arrive in time for me to read the book prior to D & O’s meeting. ARGH!!! Luckily, one of the D&O ladies said that the book was available on Hoopla (Our local Library’s app). So I happily opened my app and searched. There it was… and even better (Since I really do not like reading on electronics – I stare at a screen enough) it was available on Audiobook! Be still my heart! So I downloaded that book and listened away.

Listen away I did… the whole like 5 hrs of the book. hmmm…. thought it would take longer… but I listened, I know the story, wish a couple more details would have been discussed, but liked the book. Time for D&O’s meeting. (By the way.. the book arrived that day before the meeting)

We begin discussing the book. All of a sudden there is talk of when she was picking berries… I say “You mean when she’s walking along the property?” YES… answered many…. I sat there thinking “Hmmmmm I don’t remember berries.” The discussion continues. Finally after a few mentioned scenes and I say “I think my audiobook left out parts.” SMH… it was then that I realized the audiobook that I listened too was the Abridged version of the story. Sigh. At least it was a good laugh and a very important reminder… Read the title fully. That being said. This book was enjoyed by many. The part of the conversation, (For myself) that I most enjoyed, was when we were discussing the question “IF you had to choose one character to be from the story, who would it be and why?”

 

D&O Ladies.. any thoughts y’all would like to share regarding this book discussion?

Book Discussion of The Broken Girls

June 2018

For the month of June we read the book The Broken Girls by Simone st. James.

WOW! We all want to thank Megan for bringing this book as one of her picks… and we want to thank ourselves for voting for this book to be the book of the month. For those of you who have not read this book- here is the synopsis:

“Vermont, 1950. There’s a place for the girls whom no one wants—the troublemakers, the illegitimate, the too smart for their own good. It’s called Idlewild Hall. And in the small town where it’s located, there are rumors that the boarding school is haunted. Four roommates bond over their whispered fears, their budding friendship blossoming—until one of them mysteriously disappears…

Vermont, 2014. As much as she’s tried, journalist Fiona Sheridan cannot stop revisiting the events surrounding her older sister’s death. Twenty years ago, her body was found lying in the overgrown fields near the ruins of Idlewild Hall. And though her sister’s boyfriend was tried and convicted of murder, Fiona can’t shake the suspicion that something was never right about the case.

When Fiona discovers that Idlewild Hall is being restored by an anonymous benefactor, she decides to write a story about it. But a shocking discovery during the renovations will link the loss of her sister to secrets that were meant to stay hidden in the past—and a voice that won’t be silenced…”

This creepy tale will have you hooked in a few chapters. The way the author builds and connects the stories that take place in 1950, 1994 and 2014 will bring a chill to you. Making this book a perfect beach read! As the characters evolve and the story lines deepen, you are left wondering what is going to happen. Even myself, who typically can spot an ending, was left in the shadows, trying to figure everything out.

I have already lent this book to a couple of friends and have passed along the name of this book to many more. This story is an easy read, with deep intertwining stories that will leave you reaching for a blanket to stop the chills.